How do top players move so fast?

How do top players move so fast?

I've seen 3 minute and 1 minute matches on Chess.com where the players move at insane speeds during the last few remaining seconds of the match. 
I'm talking in milliseconds, I'd at least take that much of time to only recognize an event happening. So how do they even respond with a correct move?
How do they move so fast? Do they use some kind of special software or what?

Solutions/Answers:

Answer 1:

You’re likely looking at premoves; the players know (or at least have a good guess at) what their opponent’s move is going to be, so they can already ‘ready’ their own move by taking the piece and dropping or just moving it to the destination square. Of course, if the opponent makes another move, they have to cancel their move (if it’s still possible; that depends on the client, and whether they’re dropping or just moving) or they might make a huge blunder.

Premoving can lead to funny things like the following:

[FEN ""]
1. d4 d5 2. Bg5 e6 3. Bxd8

Here, Black expects White to play a Queens Gambit with 2. c4, which is the normal move. If Black premoves 2... e6 and notices the 2. Bg5 too late, they will lose their queen.

Answer 2:

In addition to @Glorfindel -part of the answer is also that top players really are extremely fast. They recognizes the position and patterns faster than us mortal can blink. Some of the fastest chess is played with 15 seconds on the clock. That means that the whole match is over in less than half a minute.

A search for Ultrabullet chess returns e.g.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLVK7iryHJA

or here both players berserks (meaning they only have half the time rounded e.i. 8 seconds) and play blindfolded:
https://youtu.be/6ygQMw4rBHg?t=10m54s

Here: https://youtu.be/G2AMN9tHSB0?t=1h1m25s 87 moves was made in 13.5 second. That is more than 6 moves/second.

When the chess is so fast it is difficult to tell if the clock had started counting when the move was made or if it was a premove made when the opponents clock was counting. Often you will hear players complain about lag, as even few ms of internet/server delay affects their play.

Answer 3:

When you see moves happening in milliseconds, this is usually do to premoves. Players pre-select the move they want before it’s there turn, and the server does their move immediately. I believe it used to take 0.1 seconds before, but now it might be even less time (I’m not too sure).

However, I’ve often played out an opening in only 2-3 seconds without premoves. If you know the theory, or it’s just a middlegame position that doesn’t require any calculation, moves can be played very quickly. Basically muscle memory and instinct. It also helps to hover the piece over the square you want to move it before your opponent makes their move, so all you have to do is drop the piece. Of course, if your opponent is also moving at the same speeds you are, this isn’t always possible.

Answer 4:

Correctly made premoves save a lot of time. In addition, best bullet players just have a better neurological makeup – meaning faster decision-making and reflexes – than us, mere mortals, do. You also need to have a good mouse and fast internet. For some insights of what it takes to win in blitz and bullet at the high level just watch, for example, Nakamura’s streams on Youtube.

References

Free chess computer game

Free chess computer game

I am a chess novice.
Can someone suggest a good, free chess computer game that I can use to start to learn chess by playing against the computer?  Maybe with some different difficult levels...

Solutions/Answers:

Answer 1:

It depends on which operating system you are running. If you are running a Linux OS, there are many, many options for you to choose from. One of the more-popular options is glChess.

glChess

It has a few features that make it a good game to learn on:

  • highlighting possible moves when selecting a piece
  • ability to turn board numbering on/off
  • keeps a history of moves
  • has a mechanism that allows you to iterate through the move history to see the development of the board.
  • allows configuration of computer players using several existing engines.

Once you get a little more advanced, a good one is XBoard. While designed to run on Linux, there is also a Windows port called WinBoard.

WinBoard

While it might not look as pretty as other games, it has plenty of options:

  • Like glChess, can be interfaced with several engines.
  • Can play over the internet.
  • Has an interface for Chess via email.
  • Maintains your games in SAN notation.

While very feature-rich, XBoard is probably a good one to get once you have a few games under your belt.

If you are on a Windows OS (Windows 7 or Vista) Chess Titans is good for starting-out, too. While probably scoffed at by many on this forum, the advantages of Chess Titans are:

  • Several levels of play (1 through 10) of increasing difficulty.
  • If you have Windows 7 or Vista, you probably already have it installed.
  • Aesthetically-pleasing (if you care about that).

Answer 2:

You could check out http://lichess.org as a free online resource. They have general chess discussion forums and the ability to observe previous or current games. Also you can play against a computer (at multiple difficulties) and other players.

Answer 3:

I would suggest going to chess.com and creating a free account there. You can play against computer with different difficulty levels, as well as against other players. At the same time there is loads of learning materials readily available for you (Book Openings, Tactical Trainer, Online Chess Mentor), which should prove very useful. You can also buy a premium account for 7$ per month, which will unlock even more learning opportunities like videos and etc, but a free account should be enough for the beginning.

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Answer 4:

You can play against computer for free online at http://www.apronus.com/chess/computer.htm – you can modify the strength of the computer by giving it less milliseconds to think per move. You can also set up different positions there and play them against compputer, like for example you can have the computer play as black without a queen.

References